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  Resources and References

THE SCIENCE OF LEARNING TO LEARN


Resources

One great way to feedback is to video yourself using your cell phone. This works well for all sorts of topics, from sports to presentations to just explaining what you learned that day. The videos don't have to look professional, of course. They're just a way to monitor your learning.

When it comes to coaching, see Atul Gawande “The Coach in the Operating Room,” The New Yorker, September 26, 201. Also his great piece: ”Personal Best: Top athletes and singers have coaches. Should you?,” The New Yorker, October 3, 2011,

An except of the book and my basketball lessons appeared in Slate, if you want more on my experience. If you want learn from Dwane Samuels, visit his site.

Ericsson, Anders K., and Robert Poole. Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016. 


References

I came across Mark Bernstein's story--and relied on--Anders Ericsson, "Acquisition and maintenance of medical expertise: A perspective from the expert-performance approach with deliberate practice," Academic Medicine 90, no. 11 (2015): 1471-1486. Additional details come from Adetunji Oremakinde, and Mark Bernstein, "A reduction in errors is associated with prospectively recording them: Clinical article," Journal of Neurosurgery 121, no. 2 (2014): 297-304.

Also helpful was Mark Bernstein, “The Drop Attack,” Canadian Medical Association Journal 172, no. 5 (March 1, 2005): 668–69. doi:10.1503/cmaj.050076 and Scellig Stone and Mark Bernstein, "Prospective error recording in surgery: an analysis of 1108 elective neurosurgical cases," Neurosurgery 60, no. 6 (2007): 1075-1082.

I also quoted from Dan Pompei, “Inside Gruden’s ‘Maniacal’ Obsession with Football,” Bleacher Report, May 12, 2016, http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2636358-inside-jon-grudens-maniacal-obsession-with-football (accessed September 28, 2016). Similarly, I relied on Julia Belluz, “We Spoke to 20 Experts about How to Lose Weight and Keep It Off. Here Are Their Surprisingly Simple Tips,” Vox, May 2, 2016, http://www.vox.com/2014/11/27/7289565/weight-loss-diet-tips (accessed September 28, 2016).

On feedback, see John Hattie, Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement (Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge,Taylor &Francis Group, 2009). The rooster example comes from Bridgid Finn and Janet Metcalfe, “Scaffolding Feedback to Maximize Long-Term Error Correction,” Memory & Cognition 38, no. 7 (2010): 951–61. doi:10.3758/MC.38.7.951. Also helpful was John Hattie and Helen Timperley, “The Power of Feedback,” Review of Educational Research 77, no. 1 (March 1, 2007): 81–112. doi:10.3102/003465430298487.

On curriculum, see Ulrich Boser, Matthew Chingos and Chelsea Straus, “The Hidden Value of Curriculum Reform: Do States and Districts Receive the Most Bang for Their Curriculum Buck,” Center for American Progress, October 14, 2015, https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/education/report/2015/10/14/122810/the-hidden-value-of-curriculum-reform/. The Gawande quote is from Atul Gawande “The Coach in the Operating Room.”

I quoted from John Hattie, Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement (Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge,Taylor &Francis Group, 2009).

On feedback, see the rooster example comes from Bridgid Finn and Janet Metcalfe, “Scaffolding Feedback to Maximize Long-Term Error Correction,” Memory & Cognition 38, no. 7 (2010): 951–61. doi:10.3758/MC.38.7.951.

Also helpful was John Hattie and Helen Timperley, “The Power of Feedback,” Review of Educational Research 77, no. 1 (March 1, 2007): 81–112. doi:10.3102/003465430298487.

I also relied on Andrew C. Butler, Namrata Godbole and Elizabeth Marsh,"Explanation Feedback is Better than Correct Answer Feedback for Promoting Transfer of Learning," Journal of Educational Psychology 105, no.2, (2013): 290-298,

Discussion
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